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Poster: dire--wolf Date: Oct 21, 2005 11:43pm
Forum: etree Subject: Addicted to the Dead, You Too?

I would imagine that I'm not the only one addicted to the Dead. For me it's the pure excitement of hearing a show for the 1st time. Or maybe it's comparing different Estimated jams and Bobby's howling. Or maybe it's hearing how emotional Jerry can get on different versions of To Lay Me Down. WHAT ARE YOU ADDICTED TO? I'm writting this becasue I feel since the passing of Jerry we seem to be more interested in their music. I enjoy other bands but, honestly, I don't listen to them. I'm open to other music but if I had a choice of what to listen to in the car, well guess what?

Peace

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Poster: Fishead Date: Oct 22, 2005 3:38am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: Addicted to the Dead, You Too?

here the ones i am most addicted too. all get regular airplay on my stereo's!:

#1 g. dead
#2 jerry band
#3 widespread panic
#4 radiators
#5 rush
#6 gov't mule
#7 led zepp
#8 stones
#9 doors
#10 kinks
and alot more .......

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Poster: 3roin stones Date: Oct 22, 2005 10:34am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: Addicted to the Dead, You Too?

I attended my first show in 1972 at the lovely Paramount theater in Seattle. Unlike some folks I can remember every note,every wisecrack and every jug of cheap wine that passed my way.
Looking back at the moment, I never fail to dismiss this event and many more to come as some sort of nostalgic reminiscence like many people are fond of doing regarding their prom days,etc. As I was pointing out to an old friend the other day, the Dead were always more than just music and yet at the same time just musicians that you might hear at some pub on a Saturday night.
Although I'm a big fan of Dylan,the Beatles,various blues artists and jam bamds like Phish,Widespread Panic and Stringcheese, there is no band that encircles me in a cloud of mystery and benevolence like the Grateful Dead. It seems as if they know what I need and respond with a tune.
The Grateful Dead are a spirituality without the religion, a mysticism without the saints and at the same instance, just a band of musicians on a Saturday night.
I guess what I'm trying to say is that the Dead are the only ones who do what they do. Not everyone is predisposed to love them or even like them,and you cannot dismiss the validity of other performers. But for me and others like me,the Dead's music stands alone.
Peace.

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Poster: Captain Video Date: Oct 22, 2005 1:20pm
Forum: etree Subject: Re: Addicted to the Dead, You Too?

Addiction is such a TAME word when it comes to The Dead for me. Although I am a bit of a latecomer (on the bus 5/10/80), The Dead taught me how to LISTEN. First to them, and then to everything else. My tastes run the spectrum, but at the core of it all is the good ole Grateful Dead. My lifetime pursuit of the eternal musical buzz had its foundation laid many moons ago, and they still are among the tops in my book. RIP Jerry, mass ya man....Kev

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Poster: US Blues Date: Oct 22, 2005 11:28pm
Forum: etree Subject: Re: Addicted to the Dead, You Too?

"It's an obsession, but it's pleasin'..."

Amen captain, learning to listen is a big part of the Dead experience. On the bus at MSG 1.8.79, wishing I had better ears at 1.10.79 Nassau. :-)

All musical influences meld into one, then rainbow spiral round-and-round into an experience of consciousness and existence that was unique in every moment when it was live, and unique in every subsequent listen. Watching Garcia play UJB on the Dead Movie bonus disk, his hands become those of a Sitar master playing a raga that opens long-dormat neural pathways to the higher chakras. Phil taking charge during St. Stephan (10.25.69 Winterland) and redefining psychedelic music, once again. Hunter's lyrics gentling unfolding like rose petals in your heart, even though you've heard those words a thousand time before.

Listening to the Dead has helped me become more refined in my listening to other music, because it needs to be really good to hold my interest now. The Dead are the center of my musical universe, and still I am always grateful when I discover something that can move me in the same way. The emotional tone of the music is essential.

PS- The new CD of John Coltrane playing with Thelonius Monk is a must. These guys are one of the great original Jam-bands.

Peace!

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Poster: Tyler Date: Oct 27, 2005 9:15am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: Addicted to the Dead, You Too?

unfortunately, I'm not addicted to the dead. I apprecaite what they did for live concert taping, but I just don't like their music. More so, I wish some of the other 1249 artists on the archive.org project got more recognition / ears .. seeing this place turn into a GD discussion board kinda got me bummed out ... But hey, I'm not one to bag on good music. If you like it, dig it! (and it seems a lot of you do!)

P.S. i don't mean to start a flame war or anything like that. I'm not bumming on anyone enjoying GD.. rock on if you like them. it just isn't for me.

This post was modified by Tyler on 2005-10-27 16:15:27

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Poster: Gonzoide Date: Oct 22, 2005 12:11am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: Addicted to the Dead, You Too?

I was introduced to the Dead a couple of months before Jerry died when a buddy gave me a copy of Barton Hall. I was immediately hooked and listened to little else for the next 4 or 5 years.


Pre-dead, I was a classic rock fan, Hendrix mostly, but I also loved Jazz. The Grateful Dead represents a meeting of those two worlds for me.

So after I had bought all the Dead's commercial releases and the first 10 Dick's Picks I started to feel guilty. I had all these other CD's I hadn't listened to in years. I no longer owned a tape player and my 05-08-77 was long lost, so I decided to save the dead for special events only. I figured I had heard it all anyway (LOL!). Then about 6 months ago I saw a reference to the archive in Popular Science, of all places. 120 shows downloaded and still trucking. Once again, I can't bring myself to listen to any other music but this time I feel NO guilt. I missed the "scene", which I now feel wasn't so scary after all, and I'll never forgive myself for being so provincial. I endeavor to listen to every concert on this archive at least once before I die. Long live the archive!

It's interesting to think back to my attitude toward the dead before I listened to that concert. I had heard them several times before, but it seemed like you had to be part of the "scene" with the drugs and lifestyle to appreciate it. Paying attention to what I was hearing -- really listening -- required an affirmative act on my part and I was afraid of what it all meant. Something about deadheads really scared me. I think it was the fanaticism and tendency to proselytize. Now that I know what I know, I too wonder how it's possible to NOT love the dead. I know the same thought goes through all other deadhead's minds too, but I'm proof there's a difference between hearing and listening with an open heart. I consider this out secret from the world of the musical squares.

So what am I addicted to? I think it's the idea of being in the know. Musically, the greatest art lies in mistake, not virtuousity.

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Poster: droncit Date: Oct 22, 2005 1:52am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: Addicted to the Dead, You Too?

I think that if you only listen to the Dead, you are missing the point of about half their music. Here's a case in point: Before my first show (12/18/73), I was listening to and reading about American folk music and blues. I was listening to Henry Thomas, Blind Lemon Jefferson, a lot of the old blues performers, and also Appalachian music. I had gotten a book of folk tunes from the library. One of the tunes was "Fennario," which the book's author described as "a beautiful old tune, almost never performed any more except by old timers at occasional folk festivals.

Anyway.. 12/18/73 - third song of the first set, Fennario; a little bit later and you get Henry Thomas's Don't Ease Me In.

The point is that if you don't know their influences and listen to what influences them, you can't really appreciate what they're doing. Read an interview with Phil Lesh, and he talks about classical composers and jazz performers. You really miss out on what's going on if you don't pay attention to what they're doing.

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Poster: dire--wolf Date: Oct 22, 2005 3:26am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: Addicted to the Dead, You Too?

I hear you. I definitely haven'tlimited myself to just the dead(right now i seem to be in an experiment that has only drawn me to listing to them). Being a musician I have a great understanding of their roots in folk and Jazz. For the most part, understanding their roots is important but further on down the line when exploring their thought process on stage you will have to understand that they are really just having fun with what they know. Have you ever just listend to Phil play, tunign out mentally, everyone else.

This is what is addictive. Every time you listen to a track, although the same track is always seems different, more experienced.

that can be said for all music i figure, but, like we all say, you have to go to show to understand. it is like August West trying to explain colors to the blind mand down by the docks of the city.

have fun!!

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Poster: droncit Date: Oct 22, 2005 4:25am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: Addicted to the Dead, You Too?

yes - I agree Dire.. I go through times when I will only listen to them for a while, too. It's just that if that's all someone listens to, they're missing out on so much. One way I like to think about is that, if the Dead only listened to the Dead, they wouldn't have been the Dead.

great stuff, anyway.

This post was modified by droncit on 2005-10-22 11:25:34

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Poster: deadinohio Date: Oct 27, 2005 6:50am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: Addicted to the Dead, You Too?

Addicted? I guess so. I prefer to think of it as a an ongoing journey. I've gone through long periods of not listening to them, but always come back with a vengeance. On the bus 8/26/80 at Public Hall in Cleveland. What did it? Everything that everyone above me said, and more. My greatest memory, without a doubt, was watching the lights above the ad boards at RFK in D.C. "dance" to the music in July '86. No drugs involved. Just the sound, causing the lights to vibrate. But what a synchronicitous (is that a word?) moment. The boys (and occasionally Donna) take me on a journey through American musical history, through ever-changing emotional landscapes, through mystical realms of beauty and truth punctuated by question marks. And yet, as someone said above, they were just a band you might have seen in a pub on a Saturday night. I'll never forget seeing The Kinks soon after seeing The Dead and being so disappointed that they, basically, recreated their live album on stage. The Dead have opened my ears and eyes to so many things and to so much music. And Robert Hunter's lyrics..."the light in the strangest of places if you look at it right." Ain't it so with life? And, "I love you more but Jesus loves you the best." What a joy. And then along comes the archive. Bless you all!